Club & Spade …item 2.. Alfred Hitchcock Presents – The Rose Garden …item 3.. FSU News – In marriage, instincts are telling of success (Dec. 1, 2013) — To find gut-level feelings …

Club & Spade …item 2.. Alfred Hitchcock Presents – The Rose Garden …item 3.. FSU News – In marriage, instincts are telling of success (Dec. 1, 2013) — To find gut-level feelings …
Gap

Image by marsmet472
You were the girl that changed my world … You were the girl for me … You lit the fuse, I stand accused … You were the first for me … But you turned me out, baby … You dropped a bomb on me, baby

You were my thrills, you were my pills … You dropped a bomb on me … You turn me out, you turn me on … You turned me loose, then you turned me wrong

Just like Adam and Eve, said youd set me free … You took me to the sky, Id never been so high …

You were my pills, you were my thrills … You were my hope, baby, you were my smoke …

You dropped a bomb, hey, babe …

We were in motion, felt like an ocean … You were the girl for me … You were the first explosion, turned out to be corrosion … You were the first for me
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……..*****All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ………
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…..item 1)…. youtube video … Gap Band: You dropped a bomb on me. (lyrics) … 3:57 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=at7B30dkljU

Luke Brett

Uploaded on May 10, 2010
The real lyrics to the song You dropped a bomb on me.

Category
Music

License
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 2)…. youtube video … Alfred Hitchcock Presents S02E12 The Rose Garden … 25:39 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGm28btPdH4

hui41hui

Published on Mar 15, 2012
Season 2, Episode 12, Aired 12/16/56

A publisher finds more fact than fiction in an author’s text.

Category
Entertainment

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CEMETERY LOTS Come In and Browse
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…..item 3)…. In marriage, instincts are telling of success …

… FSU News … www.fsunews.com/
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img code photo … Jim McNulty

cmsimg.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=CD&D…

Associate Professor of Psychology, Jim McNulty / Courtesy photo

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Dec. 1, 2013 |

Written by
Megan McCreery
Staff Writer

FILED UNDER
FSU News
FSU News Campus

www.fsunews.com/article/20131202/FSVIEW1/131201013/In-mar…

Walking down the aisle, most people believe they’ve met their true love and will spend the rest of their life with that person. Jim McNulty, Associate Professor of Psychology and a researcher at Florida State University, says that gut feeling could be indicative of whether or not the marriage will last.

McNulty conducted a study recently to determine whether newlyweds could predict if their marriage would bring a lifetime of happiness, or would end in unhappiness.

McNulty and his colleagues studied 135 heterosexual couples married for less than six months, and then followed up with them every six months for the following four years.

“Although they may be largely unwilling or unable to verbalize them, people’s automatic evaluations of their partners predict one of the most important outcomes of their lives–the trajectory of their marital satisfaction,” the researchers said in a paper published Nov. 29.

They believe that couples’ future happiness is largely based on individuals’ gut-level negative evaluations of their partner. In the paper, the researchers report two things: People’s conscious attitudes, or how they said they felt, did not always reflect their gut-level or automatic feelings about their marriage, and that it was their gut-level feelings, not their conscious ones, that actually predicted how happy they remained over time.

“People are pretty good at convincing themselves of what they want to believe, at least temporarily,” McNulty said. “Because getting out of a relationship can be difficult, people are frequently motivated to see their current relationship as strong and satisfying, and they can convince themselves of that. The problem is that people may not be able to hold on to that illusion forever.”

The experiment was conducted by asking participants “to provide their conscious evaluations by describing their marriage according to 15 pairs of opposing adjectives, such as “good” or “bad,” “satisfied” or “unsatisfied.” To find gut-level feelings, the researchers also worked to measure automatic attitudes towards their partners.

The experiment involved flashing a photo of the study participant’s spouse on a computer screen for just one-third of a second followed by a positive word like “awesome” or “terrific,” or a negative word like “awful” or “terrible.” The individuals simply had to press a key on the keyboard to indicate whether the word was positive or negative. The researchers used special software to measure reaction time.

“It’s generally an easy task, but flashing a picture of their spouse makes people faster or slower depending on their automatic attitude toward the spouse,” McNulty said.
“People who have really positive feelings about their partners are very quick to indicate that words like ‘awesome’ are positive words and very slow to indicate that words like ‘awful’ are negative words.”

Mcnulty explained that “people with positive gut-level attitudes were really good at processing positive words but bad at processing negative words when those automatic attitudes were activated. The opposite was also true. When a spouse had negative feelings about their partner that were activated by the brief exposure to the photo, they had a harder time switching gears to process the positive words.”

Since feelings about your spouse are crucial to your implicit feelings about them, sometimes opening up completely to each other can help peel apart the layers of your marriage, McNulty said.

“I don’t think all couples need to go to counseling. But counseling can be a good way for couples to sort out their problems,” McNulty said. “A less-positive gut-level feeling may indicate some problems that can be addressed through counseling.”

The press release distributed by the researchers reported that “Both the explicit and implicit experiments were performed only once, at the baseline, but the researchers checked in with the couples very six months and asked them to report relationship satisfaction. The researchers found that the respondents who unwittingly revealed negative or lukewarm attitudes during the implicit measure reported the most marital dissatisfaction four years later. The conscious attitudes were unrelated to changes in marital satisfaction.”

“I think the findings suggest that people may want to attend a little bit to their gut,” McNulty said. “If they can sense that their gut is telling them that there is a problem, then they might benefit from exploring that, maybe even with a professional marriage counselor.”
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